Good Intentions: The Eye of The Beholder

Many times, we start things with the best intentions. We want to help others. We want to provide for our families. We want to have a little fun. Sometimes what comes next prevents others from seeing our initial good intentions.

The eye of the beholder

We all know that different people see things differently. That’s because we all tend to view things with ourselves at the center. We look outward and determine how what we see relates to us.

If I stand in the opening of a valley, my eye will gravitate towards whatever symbolically represents what I need from the view. When I’m grateful, I watch the sunrise. When I need strength, I look to the hills. When I’m bored, I look for other creatures and bugs to watch for my entertainment. My needs probably have very little to do with why the sun rose, how the hills formed, or what business the ants were busy performing.

Aww… The cool wind blew and I felt refreshed. The sun went down and now my life’s questions are resolved. And they know nothing about my expectations for them to enrich me time and time again.

My perspective is narrow

Truth be told. My perspective is narrow. It is only focused on the parts that I can and want to see. I can zoom focus in and out or turn away from whatever does not interest me. I can miss vital happenings and totally lose clues about my surroundings.

Oh look! A jackrabbit is running (hopping? Running? Skipping? I don’t know but he’s sure moving fast). How exciting! Maybe I can film it and sell the video to National Geo (Go! Blue and yellow!). Oh shit! A coyote is chasing him!! Where did he come from? Why did he have to ruin my shot?!? The whole universe is against me!!!!

Image: Bob Kahn, Drawing on Instinct

This is the same way that we can miss the bigger picture when we are observing the behaviours of other people. We tend to view others that we come in contact with through that same narrow lens. Seeing only the parts that relate to us and our own good intentions.

No judgment y’all. It completely makes sense. If I meet a fellow blogger, chances are that we will be conversant with blogging tips and marketing expertise. Even if we expound on some personal areas, it’s sure to coincide with why and how we started blogging. We will walk away with a great new connection; however, our scope of really understanding what drives the other person is limited. This is also true for what obstacles they may face.

I confess that everyday I wake up with the intention to add one more post to my content. In actuality, I write maybe three days a week. Based on almost every How To Blog article I’ve read, I am doomed to lose the interest of my readers because I fail the daily challenge.

I won’t make excuses, because no one cares WHY you didn’t do something they think you should do. Chances are they’ve already judged through their own needs why you have not lived up to the potential they thought you had. My reasons are mine and the way I see it is narrowed down to me.

Truth: In all honesty, I don’t write everyday, because I don’t have something to say everyday. I do not like to hear myself talk just for the sake of hearing my own voice. My writing is my voice. It’s truly that simple.

Be merciful

Give a little mercy when someone fails to live up to their good intentions. We have to try not to immediately believe that they purposely set out to sabotage us. Our lives may overlap and intersect, but we still have individual goals and objectives.

Our vantage points give us a stingy view of what’s going on in other people’s lives. Be willing to judge other’s intentions with the same grace and mercy that your own mistakes require.


My contribution to the DP Prompt:Conversant


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